Tag Archives: photography

From the Top of Nemrut Dağı

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Of all the gorgeous places in Turkey – Pammukale, Cappadocia, Kekova, Istanbul – it’d be pretty easy to skip right over Nemrut Dağı. After all, it’s tucked away in the southeastern corner of the country, only a few hundred miles from the Syrian border, far off of the well-traveled circuit of Istanbul, Pammukale, and Antalya.

The Taurus Mountains, looking towards the Euphrates River
The Taurus Mountains, looking towards the Euphrates River

And it’s a world totally different. Where the Mediterranean areas of Turkey are resplendent with brilliant greens and blues, the southeastern parts of the country feature a far more muted palette, one filled with dusty greens, beiges, and greys. Drive through the southeastern part of Turkey and you’ll have no doubt that you’re properly in the Middle East. The desert heat radiates from the sandy ground, and the horizon is hidden in a muddled, heat-rippled haze. That’s not to say that the area still isn’t beautiful; it’s just a totally different kind of beauty compared to the glittering wares of the Grand Bazaar, the stark white of Pammukale, and the brilliant blues of Kekova.

The view from breakfast in the Taurus Mountains
The view from breakfast in the Taurus Mountains
Waiting for the sun to set on Mount Nemrut.
Waiting for the sun to set on Mount Nemrut.

At seven thousand feet, Nemrut Dağı, which is part of the Taurus Mountains Ragne, is the major destination of the area around Kahta, the nearest town. Getting there involves winding your way along steep roads that cling to the sides of the hills. There’s a reason that nearly everyone who goes to Nemrut Dağı does so with a driver from the area: trying to drive those roads if you’re not familiar with them would be like saying, “I wouldn’t mind plummeting to my death today.”

The statues and busts on the eastern terrace.
The statues and busts on the eastern terrace.
Heads on the western terrace.
Heads on the western terrace.

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A Stunner of a Sunset at Pamukkale

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I have seen beautiful places in the world…and then I have seen Pamukkale. I separate those two because Pamukkale, with its stark white travertines and milky blue water, needs to be put in a category all its own. It’s downright otherworldly, one of those places whose beauty is so off-the-wall and unexpected that you think Mother Nature must have been a little tipsy when she dreamed it up.

The travertines of Pamukkale
The travertines of Pamukkale

Make no mistake about it; Pamukkale was a place that had been on my bucket list since the day I put it down on paper, and it was one of the things that put Turkey above a few other places for my summer vacation destination of choice. Even though a few months have passed, the views I took in there remain unbelievably beautiful in my mind, undimmed and undiluted.

Calcium carbonate deposits have covered the hillside.
Calcium carbonate deposits have covered the hillside.

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Beneath Istanbul Lies the Basilica Cistern

Unlike the rest of the city in August, the Basilica Cistern isn't boiling hot.
Unlike the rest of the city in August, the Basilica Cistern isn’t boiling hot.

In August, Istanbul is an oven. The temperatures hover right around ninety degrees, but the swampy humidity and sweaty crowds that mob the sun-drenched city make it seem far hotter. Any place that provides the tiniest bit of shade or breeze becomes a refuge from the heat, be that a marble mosque, a rooftop terrace of a café in Sultanahment, the shady avenues of Gülhane Park, or the air conditioned hallways of a museum. Istanbul’s best place, though, to beat the heat can’t be found in any of those places; it’s underneath them.

Another Turkish name for the cistern is 'Yerebatan Sarnıcı", or "sunken cistern."
Another Turkish name for the cistern is ‘Yerebatan Sarnıcı”, or “sunken cistern.”

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