Throwback Thursday: Parc Güell in Barcelona

"El Drac" ("The Dragon"), which welcomes visitors to Parc Güell.
“El Drac” (“The Dragon”), which welcomes visitors to Parc Güell.

Seeing as the demon residing in my nasal cavities is still putting up quite a fight, despite me throwing hefty doses of Nyquil, Dayquil, and cursing its way, this Throwback Thursday post is technically just one long photoessay. Such is what the laziness of being sick brings.

Sitting on the main terrace.
Sitting on the main terrace.

In a city that belongs to architect Antoni Gaudí, Parc Güell is probably the most expansive of his accomplishments. Half garden, half architectural playground, Parc Güell is an essential part of any visit to Barcelona. (And it’s free, too!) However, it’s definitely not a “get in, walk around for five minutes, get out” sort of place. No, you need the better part of an entire day to get through the whole thing.

Getting there is where the battle begins. Parc Güell isn't located in close proximity to any metro stops. You'll end up walking around twenty minutes. The main entrance is closest to the Lesseps, and the side entrance is closest to Vallcarca, near where this picture was taken. Prepare your calves now. They'll be hurting.
Getting there is where the battle begins. Parc Güell isn’t located in close proximity to any metro stops. You’ll end up walking around twenty minutes. The main entrance is closest to the Lesseps, and the side entrance is closest to Vallcarca, near where this picture was taken. Prepare your calves now. They’ll be hurting.

The park is a great place to  bask in the Catalan sun (or in my case, redden my sunburn), and there are plenty of musicians to provide a soundtrack.
The park is a great place to bask in the Catalan sun (or in my case, redden my sunburn), and there are plenty of musicians, conventional and otherwise, to provide a soundtrack.
One of the main draws of Parc Güell is the main terrace.
One of the main draws of Parc Güell is the main terrace.
Parc Güell is located in the García district on the hill of El Carmel, and the views it provides of the rest of the city are beautiful, even on the haziest of summer days.
Parc Güell is located in the García district on the hill of El Carmel, and the views  from the terrace of the rest of the city are beautiful, even on the haziest of summer days.
A long, uninterrupted bench in the form of a sea serpent provides seating on the terrace.
A long, uninterrupted bench in the form of a sea serpent provides seating on the terrace.
A side view of the mosaic tiles.
A side view of the mosaic tiles.
Away from the bench, a few small cafés and restaurants offer some shade and sangria.
Away from the bench, a few small cafés and restaurants offer some shade and sangria.
Beneath the terrace is the Salon of a Hundred Columns, which offers cool respite from the sandy heat.
Beneath the terrace is the Salon of a Hundred Columns, which offers cool respite from the sandy heat.
The ceiling of the salon is dotted with colorful tiles.
The ceiling of the salon is dotted with mosaics made from colorful trencadis (broken pieces of glazed ceramic tiles).
A spiky variant.
A spiky variant.
A footway underneath the park's roadway viaduct. The diagonal columns slope outward to bear the weight of the road overhead.
A footway underneath the park’s roadway viaduct.
Smooth and polished wasn't really part of Gaudí's Modernist style.
Smooth and polished wasn’t really part of Gaudí’s Modernist style. His version of the carytid (right) are a far cry from their famous Greek counterparts that hold up the Porch of the Erechtheion at the Acropolis in Athens.
Given the hot, sandy location of the park, it's not really a surprise that a lot of the green in the park comes from cacti.
Given the hot, sandy location of the park, it’s not really a surprise that a lot of the plants in the park are cacti…
Though you'll still find plenty of bright spots of color elsewhere.
…but not all of them.
The entrance of Parc Güell.
The entrance of Parc Güell.

 

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